82. A sleeve like this is timeless. It’s incredible. There are so many levels and different variations. It was probably done in installments and it’s a fascinating piece. You can see on the top of the shoulder how that was probably one piece and then he continued to add on throughout his arm. The artist did a rather stellar job in making the entire piece flow so well. That’s not an easy accomplishment and this artist makes it look simple!

I wore them to a work party and my coworkers freaked when I pulled my shirt sleeves up. I ultimately told them I was kidding around. I also wore them at a gastropub and to the mall/movies with friends. I can not wait to shock other friends that have not seem me in a while! Girls look at you differently. I am telling you these things are chick magnets! These styles are awesome. I was told that they are all Hells Angels Biker Tats! The other cool thing is you can try a bunch and see whether you want to get real tats and which tats to get. You might enjoy them for a few months and decide you don't want to get pemament tats afterall .
Regardless, if you are going to start with a single tattoo, in any location, be sure to tell your artist that your eventual end goal is a full sleeve. “She or he can leave the piece in a way that it can be added to in time,” Gualteros says. “Basically, to get the best result for this, you should ask for flow.” (That’s tattoo-artist speak for “something that will flow nicely with other designs”.)
You can also go for portraits of fictional characters considered by many as a badass. Examples of which include Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) from Game of Thrones, Darth Maul (Ray Park) from Star Wars, the T-800 Terminator (Arnold Schwarzenegger) from the Terminator films, and Blade (Wesley Snipes) from the Blade films. Be sure that the tattoo artist is well-experienced in the portrait department, though.
Since the 1970s, tattoos have become a mainstream part of Western fashion, common among both genders, to all economic classes[citation needed] and to age groups from the later teen years to middle age. For many young Americans, the tattoo has taken on a decidedly different meaning than for previous generations. The tattoo has "undergone dramatic redefinition" and has shifted from a form of deviance to an acceptable form of expression.[61]
Yeah, yeah, we know that tattoos are permanent, expensive, and straight-up painful—but with style-savvy celebs like Rihanna, Cara Delevingne, Miley Cyrus and Kylie Jenner regularly seen showing off their cute tats, we’re still totally feigning for some fresh ink. These stars don’t have full sleeves, but instead rock smaller, simpler designs on their skin.
Many of the inspirations of great numbers of people who are going for these tattoos are famous celebrities. Well, there is no question about that since people tend to do what their idols are doing. They want to look like their celebrity idols, which is why they allowed themselves to get tattooed. In relation to this, here are some of the world-renowned celebrities nowadays who are proudly displaying their tattoos on their arms:
To help you, at least a little, we got some design suggestions from Sean Dowdell, co-owner of Club Tattoo, which has locations in Las Vegas, as well as Mesa, Tempe, and Scottsdale, AZ. Dowdell's team has inked celebs like Slash, Miley Cyrus, Amar’e Stoudemire, Blake Shelton, Steve Aoki, and Keith Sweat. We asked him for suggestions on the most popular types of tattoos today—and ones that will look good with time, instead of feeling dated to a certain decade.

A growing trend in the US and UK is to place artistic titoos over the surgical scars of a mastectomy. "More women are choosing not to reconstruct after a mastectomy and tattoo over the scar tissue instead.... The mastectomy tattoo will become just another option for post cancer patients and a truly personal way of regaining control over post cancer bodies and proving once and for all that breast cancer is not just a pink ribbon."[27] The tattooing of nipples on reconstructed breasts remains in high demand, however.[28]


At first glance it looks like an actual tattoo gun tucked in to a garter, if you look a little closer though you can see it’s actually a very realistic looking 3d style tattoo. The detail and shadowing is exceptional on this design and would have definitely been done by a very talented artist. If you’re looking for a certain style of tattoo such as the one above a great place to find artists can be social media.

A well-known example is the Nazi practice of forcibly tattooing Nazi concentration camp inmates with identification numbers during The Holocaust as part of the Nazis' identification system, beginning in fall 1941.[16] The Nazis' SS introduced the practice at Auschwitz concentration camp in order to identify the bodies of registered prisoners in the concentration camps. During registration, the Nazis would pierce the outlines of the serial-number digits onto the prisoners' arms. Of the Nazi concentration camps, only Auschwitz put tattoos on inmates.[17] The tattoo was the prisoner's camp number, sometimes with a special symbol added: some Jews had a triangle, and Romani had the letter "Z" (from German Zigeuner for "Gypsy"). In May 1944, the Jewish men received the letters "A" or "B" to indicate particular series of numbers.

×