Many tattoos serve as rites of passage, marks of status and rank, symbols of religious and spiritual devotion, decorations for bravery, sexual lures and marks of fertility, pledges of love, amulets and talismans, protection, and as punishment, like the marks of outcasts, slaves and convicts. The symbolism and impact of tattoos varies in different places and cultures. Tattoos may show how a person feels about a relative (commonly mother/father or daughter/son) or about an unrelated person.[13] Today, people choose to be tattooed for artistic, cosmetic, sentimental/memorial, religious, and magical reasons, and to symbolize their belonging to or identification with particular groups, including criminal gangs (see criminal tattoos) or a particular ethnic group or law-abiding subculture. Popular verses include John 3:16, Philippians 4:13, and Psalms 23.[14]
Regardless, if you are going to start with a single tattoo, in any location, be sure to tell your artist that your eventual end goal is a full sleeve. “She or he can leave the piece in a way that it can be added to in time,” Gualteros says. “Basically, to get the best result for this, you should ask for flow.” (That’s tattoo-artist speak for “something that will flow nicely with other designs”.)
Leave the colors to the artist. Hamlet suggests not bringing in a fully rendered drawing of the image and colors you want. The more I interview tattoo artists, the more I am coming to understand that getting a tattoo is like commissioning an artist to paint a mural. You do own the building, but you don't hand the artist a photo of another artist's mural and tell them to replicate it for you. Instead, you say your building works for peace and you want a mural that conveys that message and that you especially love lily of the valley flowers and the image of the rising sun. Then you let the artist do what they do: Create some art!
Each militarybranch has their own restrictions pertaining to tattoos. As of April 2007, the United States Marines Corp. banned tattoo sleeves except for those already grandfathered in prior to the policy change. If you plan on enlisting you can forget tattoo sleeves for now. This consideration must also be made for employment. Potential employers may have regulations banning sleeve tattoos or any visible tattoos for that matter. If you must stay sheathed from shoulder to wrist, you'll be hot in the summer.

The first documented professional tattooist in Britain was Sutherland Macdonald, who operated out of a salon in London beginning in 1894.[50] In Britain, tattooing was still largely associated with sailors[51] and the lower or even criminal class,[52] but by the 1870s had become fashionable among some members of the upper classes, including royalty,[3][53] and in its upmarket form it could be an expensive[54] and sometimes painful[55] process. A marked class division on the acceptability of the practice continued for some time in Britain.[56] Recently, a trend has arisen marketed as 'Stick and Poke' tattooing; primitive figures are permanently inscribed by the user himself after he obtains a 'DIY' kit containing needles, ink and a collection of suggestions.[57]
In terms of tattoos on actual bodies, the earliest known examples were for a long time Egyptian and were present on several female mummies dated to c. 2000 B.C. But following the more recent discovery of the Iceman from the area of the Italian-Austrian border in 1991 and his tattoo patterns, this date has been pushed back a further thousand years when he was carbon-dated at around 5,200 years old.
No one wants to be told how to feel about their tattoos ten, twenty, or fifty years down the road. The truth is you might hate your tattoos or you may love them. There's no way to tell if you'll have regrets. The best advice for tattoo sleeves is to stick with a theme and then invest time into your idea from start to finish. Consider your job, future, and your lifestyle. Avoid name tattoos when you can and, by all means, spend the time to find a few good artist(s)to create a pleasing display.
Half sleeves are usually just a pit stop on the road to getting a full sleeve. You miss the smell of the ink and vaseline and crave the feel of the needle creating a masterpiece on your skin. People often start with a half sleeve before they decide to complete it and finish the entire thing. They are sometimes viewed as incomplete until the rest of the arm is done. They are easier to cover and you don’t necessarily need a long sleeved shirt to cover them.
Tattoo sleeves basically refer to those tattoo designs that are usually large in size or cover a huge part of your arm or leg when put together. This type of tattoos starts from the shoulder of a person and continues till the down part of the arm displaying a particular theme.Tattoo sleeve ideas and designs are widely used by both man and women in 2016 and becoming quite popular due to the incredible designs they offer. This is the main reason when you look for a sleeve tattoo design meeting your interests you get confused.Before choosing your design, don’t ignore the fact that sleeve tattoos are large enough and eye-catchy, so they easily grab more attention than any other tattoo design.
You can also go for portraits of fictional characters considered by many as a badass. Examples of which include Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) from Game of Thrones, Darth Maul (Ray Park) from Star Wars, the T-800 Terminator (Arnold Schwarzenegger) from the Terminator films, and Blade (Wesley Snipes) from the Blade films. Be sure that the tattoo artist is well-experienced in the portrait department, though.

Today's the day, you're ready to commit, and you just know in your heart — it's tattoo time! Now you need help figuring out how to pick a full tattoo sleeve theme. I've been on a mission for Bustle, interviewing tattoo artists all over the Bay Area. My goal has been to learn more about tattoo sleeves so I can help ladies who are ready to go under the gun, but still need more information. I've covered what part of a tattoo sleeve hurts the most and facts to know before getting started. I wrote a piece answering how long does a full sleeve tattoo take and how to deal with aftercare. But I honestly think picking the theme is the most exciting part.
Tattoos have also been used for identification in other ways. As early as the Zhou, Chinese authorities would employ facial tattoos as a punishment for certain crimes or to mark prisoners or slaves. During the Roman Empire, gladiators and slaves were tattooed: exported slaves were tattooed with the words "tax paid", and it was a common practice to tattoo "Stop me, I'm a runaway" on their foreheads.[18] Owing to the Biblical strictures against the practice,[19] Emperor Constantine I banned tattooing the face around AD 330, and the Second Council of Nicaea banned all body markings as a pagan practice in AD 787.[20]
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