82. A sleeve like this is timeless. It’s incredible. There are so many levels and different variations. It was probably done in installments and it’s a fascinating piece. You can see on the top of the shoulder how that was probably one piece and then he continued to add on throughout his arm. The artist did a rather stellar job in making the entire piece flow so well. That’s not an easy accomplishment and this artist makes it look simple!
I love my Bad Ass tattoos. Steve is an amazing artist that understands his canvas well. He has done ...a small piece on my shoulder, some lettering, and a very large floral arrangement that runs from my ankle to my knee. My leg was done in two sittings, I was charged for the time his gun was running not the time in the chair or the shop. I am elated with all the work he has done on me. I have had work done at other shops in Cheyenne, I don't have complaints, Steve is simply the best. See More

Tattoos are also placed on animals, though rarely for decorative reasons. Pets, show animals, thoroughbred horses, and livestock are sometimes tattooed with identification and other marks. Tattooing with a 'slap mark' on the shoulder or on the ear is the standard identification method in commercial pig farming. Branding is used for similar reasons and is often performed without anesthesia, but is different from tattooing as no ink or dye is inserted during the process, the mark instead being caused by permanent scarring of the skin.[24] Pet dogs and cats are sometimes tattooed with a serial number (usually in the ear, or on the inner thigh) via which their owners can be identified. However, the use of a microchip has become an increasingly popular choice and since 2016 is a legal requirement for all 8.5 million pet dogs in the UK.[25]
Many studies have been done of the tattooed population and society's view of tattoos. In June 2006, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology published the results of a telephone survey of 2004. It found that 36% of Americans ages 18–29, 24% of those 30–40, and 15% of those 41–51 had a tattoo.[58] In September 2006, the Pew Research Center conducted a telephone survey that found that 36% of Americans ages 18–25, 40% of those 26–40 and 10% of those 41–64 had a tattoo. They concluded that Generation X and Generation Y express themselves through their appearance, and tattoos are the most popular form of self-expression.[59] In January 2008, a survey conducted online by Harris Interactive estimated that 14% of all adults in the United States have a tattoo, slightly down from 2003, when 16% had a tattoo. Among age groups, 9% of those ages 18–24, 32% of those 25–29, 25% of those 30–39 and 12% of those 40–49 have tattoos, as do 8% of those 50–64. Men are slightly more likely to have a tattoo than women.
"You can never go wrong with black and greyscale tattoos," Villani says. "Black ink lasts better than any color ever will [...] Bright and vibrant colors look great at first, but tend to fade the quickest. This is often why watercolor tattoos are frowned upon. They tend to not always last the test of time." So, if you and your artist are brainstorming a design, remember to consider color as part of the equation.
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And this is when I realise that all my endless self-examination was completely pointless. What I think, or don’t think, about tattoos is irrelevant. Because this is the point. Tattoos are fashionable. They may even be beautiful. (Just because I hate them doesn’t mean I’m right.) But by deciding to have a tattoo, my son took a meat cleaver to my apron strings. He may not have wanted to hurt me. I hope he didn’t. But my feelings, as he made his decision, were completely unimportant.

Full Sleeve Warrior Tattoos – The warrior full sleeve design may present the pictures of warriors and weapons, engaged in conflicts and wars. Such a tattoo design reflects sheer power and strength. Other designs may include elements such as hearts, dreamcatchers, feathers, arrow, and skulls. Clock, compass, geometric, anchor, musical symbols and angels are some other common things used in such a design. One can have as many of them included in tattoo sleeves design as he wants, but it has to be discussed with the designers, right from the beginning stages of the tattoo, so that he can plan the design accordingly.
Because these protection papers were used to define freemen and citizenship, many black sailors and other men also used them to show that they were freemen if they were stopped by officials or slave catchers. They also called them "free papers" because they certified their non-slave status. Many of the freed blacks used descriptions of tattoos for identification purposes on their freedom papers.[65]
Getting a sleeve tattoo is a big investment in terms of both cost and hours spent a chair. For this reason a lot of guys go in to add one or two small tattoos from time to time while tying it all together with a matching background. Another approach is to take on the entire sleeve at once, which means more cash upfront and longer hours at a time. If you have the money and both you and your artist have the time, go for it. Otherwise, have patience knowing that eventually your sleeve will be complete and looking awesome.
Artists and designers have come up with a great variety, as such tattoos are based absolutely on their creativity and capability. In fact, they present a great scope for them to explore their talent in tattoo designing as each design can be a completely different set of smaller designs. This means that there is a possibility for each and every sleeve design to be unique and different from the rest. Here are some common tattoo sleeves designs:
The terms tattoo sleeve, full sleeve, half sleeve, etc. are generic terms given to tattoo designs covering the arm or leg in a close-knit pattern resembling that of a sleeve. The validity of this term is occasionally brought into question but has gained wider acceptance over the years, especially since the dawn of the internet age. “Full sleeve” is just a tad bit catcher and descriptive than searching the web for “full arm piece tattoos.” Most contemporary artists have accepted the term and regularly use it.
No one wants to be told how to feel about their tattoos ten, twenty, or fifty years down the road. The truth is you might hate your tattoos or you may love them. There's no way to tell if you'll have regrets. The best advice for tattoo sleeves is to stick with a theme and then invest time into your idea from start to finish. Consider your job, future, and your lifestyle. Avoid name tattoos when you can and, by all means, spend the time to find a few good artist(s)to create a pleasing display.

A menacing skull peeks beneath a hooded cloak, a yellow and black snake lies coiled, ready to strike, and a trail of red roses litter a climbing vine. These make up just a few of the designs available in an instant with tattoo sleeves. Within minutes, the arms display unique and colorful body art without the pain and perpetuity of authentic tattoos. Creative shoppers looking for distinctive tattoo sleeves find a wide range sporting colorful objects, figures, and designs from reliable sellers on eBay. Consumers can choose pairs of sleeves or entire sets featuring artwork from light and delicate to bold and graphic. Try one sleeve or two paired with a chunky, leather and metal cuff for a look that says "tough and independent." Striking tribal tattoo sleeves in black, navy, or dark green make a statement worn under a white or black T-shirt, and a full tattoo sleeve shirt offers an amusing look for parties or clubbing. People looking for a more permanent solution find a variety of tattoo patterns for inspiration, and post-tattoo essentials like Tattoo Goo for successful after care.

Hildebrandt began traveling from camp to camp to tattoo soldiers, making his popularity increase, and also giving birth to the tradition of getting tattoos while being an American serviceman. Soon after the Civil War, tattoos became fashionable among upper-class young adults. This trend lasted until the beginning of World War I. The invention of the electric tattoo machine caused popularity of tattoos among the wealthy to drop off. The machine made the tattooing procedure both much easier and cheaper, thus, eliminating the status symbol tattoos previously held, as they were now affordable for all socioeconomic classes. The status symbol of a tattoo shifted from a representation of wealth, to a mark typically seen on rebels and criminals. Despite this change, tattoos remained popular among military servicemen, and the tradition continues today.
You’ll want your new ink to reflect your tastes, so do what you love, and keep an eye out for things that would look great on your skin. If you’re really into art, check out an exhibit or museum. If nature’s your deal, take a hike or go camping. If you follow your passion, sometimes the perfect tattoo idea will jump right out at you when you least expect it.
Some tribal cultures traditionally created tattoos by cutting designs into the skin and rubbing the resulting wound with ink, ashes or other agents; some cultures continue this practice, which may be an adjunct to scarification. Some cultures create tattooed marks by hand-tapping the ink into the skin using sharpened sticks or animal bones (made into needles) with clay formed disks or, in modern times, actual needles.
Having become more prominent than ever, there isn’t a part of the body that is off limits. The ink art has been done on most major and minor skin parts of the body. However, most men prefer having a sleeve tattoo as a man which can be quite impressive when a befitting design and a good color is used in its creation. Generally it appropriate and even advisable to opt for a sleeve tattoo for men as a man compared to having it done on other body parts. Outlined below are reasons why.
Tattoos were probably also used in ancient medicine as part of the treatment of the patient. In 1898, Daniel Fouquet, a medical doctor, wrote an article on “medical tattooing” practices in Ancient Egypt, in which he describes the tattooed markings on the female mummies found at the Deir el-Bahari site. He speculated that the tattoos and other scarifications observed on the bodies may have served a medicinal or therapeutic purpose: "The examination of these scars, some white, others blue, leaves in no doubt that they are not, in essence, ornament, but an established treatment for a condition of the pelvis, very probably chronic pelvic peritonitis."[32]
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