Not everyone in society will appreciate a good tattoo and sometimes you might be forced to attend functions where showing off your tattoo might not be appropriate. For the neck, head, face or finger tattoos this can pose a challenge when it comes to concealment, but the sleeve tattoo will enable you to conceal your tattoo if you have to attend gatherings where the crowd is not very tattoo-friendly. The sleeve tattoo in this case becomes an advantage and underneath the shirt, you still get to maintain that symbol that means something to you.
Discuss and plan with your artist. Never go into this with a permanent vision. You should talk to your tattoo artist about your likes and dislikes and tell them exactly what you want to convey. They will sit down with you and plan out several designs that will incorporate your ideas. Allow them some freedom of artistry. In the end, you will have the final say in what gets permanently inked on your body, but, before then, let the artist do what they do best: design.
There are certain sayings, which you wish to reveal out to the outside world, but can’t say directly through your mouth. The best thing is to get your desired saying tattooed on your skin. To make it look unique, you can complement it with some images and pictures you wish to honor. You can use different fonts to write scriptures, so that you are able to create a unique design at the end.

Choosing a tattoo can be stressful because it's so long-term; a tattoo is so permanent. Making the wrong decision can be painful, costly and inconvenient. There are so many factors to consider before making the final decision, including size, color, meaning, style and placement of the design as well as the artist you choose to help you get the tattoo you want. The bottom line, however, is to take your time and get plenty of information about tattoos before choosing. This hub offers some ste
Tattoodo is a social network designed exclusively for tattoo lovers. Co-founded by Ami James of Miami Ink fame, Tattoodo is one of the most visited tattoo sites in the world. The site, along with accompanying mobile apps, boasts an impressive 30 million users. Having found international acclaim through his TV work, James set out to develop the complete tattoo resource where users can upload and browse ink pics, find and follow artists, view tattoo-related videos, and read interviews and guides.
The symbolism of the butterfly is as diverse as the species itself. Often associated with the soul, the butterfly may represent the spiritual realm. It is also a strong symbol of transformation because the butterfly transforms from a caterpillar into a butterfly, becoming something new and beautiful. This can be a powerful tattoo for those who have endured hardship of any kind and have found a new, better life...

Shop around for artists. The biggest mistake people make is designing their own tattoo before picking out an artist. That design is going to change because no two artists will draw the same object in the same way. Every artist has their own style and flair. Pick one you love based on their style, and work with them to visualize your ideas. If you want a shark tattoo, and the artist doesn't have a shark in his/her portfolio, it doesn't matter. Every artist can draw a shark. It's how they draw it that matters. Once you pick out an artist you like, do some research on what makes a good tattoo artist and see if they check off everything on the list. Aside from style, professionalism and personality are equally important factors.

A lot of us have imagined ourselves with those same kinds of full-arm sleeves. For some, it could work well with our no-fucks-to-give persona. For others, it's an aesthetic decision, or an emotional one. If you’re serious about it though, then it’s worth knowing what planning is involved—from inception, to execution, to maintenance. So we spoke with Nicolas Gualteros, tattoo artist at Senaspace in NYC, to plot it all out.

Modern Japanese tattoos are real works of art, with many modern practioners, while the highly skilled tattooists of Samoa continue to create their art as it was carried out in ancient times, prior to the invention of modern tattooing equipment. Various cultures throughout Africa also employ tattoos, including the fine dots on the faces of Berber women in Algeria, the elaborate facial tattoos of Wodabe men in Niger and the small crosses on the inner forearms which mark Egypt's Christian Copts.


Yowza, That Looks Uncomfortable Delicious Food & Drink Tiny Tats Badass in Three Dimensions Minimalist Designs Very Clever Visual Jokes Amazing Geometric Shapes Genius Cover-Up Tattoos Cute Little Symbols with Meaning Clever Puns '90s Pop Culture Breathtaking Watercolor Hyperrealism Adorable Pet Tributes Celebrity Cover-Ups Inspired by Nature Awesome Ambigrams From the Pages of Children's Books Parents & Kids Scar Covers
The most difficult part about getting a tattoo is planning the theme, the motif, and the design. Planing is even more important when it comes to sleeves because they are elaborate works of art that take a long time to draw. You don't want to go through hours of pain and then be unsatisfied with the final result. Work closely with your artist to come up with the exact image and colors.
As with any tattoo, you’ll need to keep your bandages on for a few hours, then Gualteros says to wash the tattoo with antibacterial soap and water, let it air dry for 10 minutes, and put a thin layer of Aquaphor on it after each shower for the first two days. (Then switch to unscented body lotion.) While the tattoo heals, wash it 2-3 times a day until peeling stops. This usually takes one week. Continue with light layers of unscented lotion.
Ancient tattooing traditions have also been documented among Papuans and Melanesians, with their use of distinctive obsidian skin piercers. Some archeological sites with these implements are associated with the Austronesian migration into Papua New Guinea and Melanesia. But other sites are older than the Austronesian expansion, being dated to around 1650 to 2000 BCE, suggesting that there was a preexisting tattooing tradition in the region.[37][40]

"When LeBron James has his photograph taken, the content immediately has two streams of rights that will govern how it may be used commercially," begins the filing. James has rights of publicity, which control how his name, image and likeness can be used commercially. Meanwhile, the content creator — in this scenario the photographer — owns the copyright to the image. 


The answers to those questions will determine whether you’re looking for a design or a specific image. A lot of guys are going for floral, geometric, or tribal designs just for the artistry. They add some flair to your skin. Other men choose images of religious figures, verses of Scriptures, or popular quotes to remind themselves and others what they believe in. Others feature tattoos of tigers, warriors, and dragons to show their strength. Still others get tattoos of skulls, an hourglass, or death faces to say, “I know it’s coming and I’m not afraid.” Finally, many men get tattoos of their favorite superheroes, movie characters, video games, or sports team logos as a sign of where their interests lie.
16. He left quite a bit of skin in between his images which is another popular look for sleeves. They don’t have to cover your entire arm although many people choose to do that. This allows for more art down the road or he may choose to leave the spots open forever. People feel mixed about this because some think it creates an unfinished look. At the end of the day, it’s up to your personal preference.
Once you’ve got your tattoo idea or concept in hand, set up an appointment or just stop by our convenient location at Universal CityWalk. You can put down a deposit, with ALL of that money going straight towards the tattoo, and have a consultation with one of our tattoo artists. At that point, they can begin to sketch something up to show you and you’ll have the chance to tweak it until it’s perfect! This is key: here at H&H Orlando, we want to make sure all of our customers really love their ink. Which means we'll work on the design until you’re totally happy with it before the tattooing actually begins.

Half-sleeves or quarter-sleeves are tattoos that cover only part of an arm, usually above the elbow, but can also be found below the elbow. A sleeve implies complete tattoo coverage of a particular area, so a half sleeve is a tattoo that covers the entire upper or lower arm. A "quarter sleeve" usually covers the area of skin from the shoulder midway to the elbow.[1]
In Britain, there is evidence of women with tattoos, concealed by their clothing, throughout the 20th century, and records of women tattooists such as Jessie Knight from the 1920s.[79] A study of "at-risk" (as defined by school absenteeism and truancy) adolescent girls showed a positive correlation between body modification and negative feelings towards the body and low self-esteem; however, the study also demonstrated that a strong motive for body modification is the search for "self and attempts to attain mastery and control over the body in an age of increasing alienation".[80] The prevalence of women in the tattoo industry in the 21st century, along with larger numbers of women bearing tattoos, appears to be changing negative perceptions.
Getting a tattoo, although a permanent decision regardless, can yield all sorts of different results as the years go by. Some of the tattoos that look coolest in the short-term may end up changing drastically over time. And this can be really frustrating if you weren't prepared. Luckily, there are some tattoos that look better with age, and tattoo artists know exactly what they are.
Dowdell says that Celtic and tribal tattoos are on the way out (and those similar in design). You might associate them with muscled celebrities and athletes, and recognize them for their ornate patterns or scenery. A Celtic tattoo uses black ink to background crosses, trees, or folkloric animals. A tribal tattoo uses black ink to fill in spiraling, zigzagging arrows and lines, often migrating from the pec onto the shoulder and arm. The tricky thing about tattoos is that you still see the ones that are “out of style”, because they’re permanently on the wearer. So, Dowdell’s point is that he’s doing far fewer of these types anymore, in favor of the aforementioned ones. As seen on: The Rock’s shoulder and arm. (His is technically a Polynesian tattoo, but stylistically in the same vein.)
In the period of early contact between the Māori and Europeans, the Maori people hunted and decapitated each other for their moko tattoos, which they traded for European items including axes and firearms.[21] Moko tattoos were facial designs worn to indicate lineage, social position, and status within the tribe. The tattoo art was a sacred marker of identity among the Maori and also referred to as a vehicle for storing one's tapu, or spiritual being, in the afterlife.[22]
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