I am 6'3 and 205 with larger arms. These fit me OK. They run about 2/3 of the way up my arm and the top can be hidden by a shirt sleeve. They are 92% nylon and 8% spandex. They have a bit of ruuberband around the upper arm piece to hold it in place. The material feels like a women's nylon sock and I would guess holds up well to being stretched but not to snags or sharp objects.
Of course, you can always go for tattoo designs based on badass comic book characters. But make sure the design isn’t too cartoony, which defeats the purpose of a badass tattoo. This means the design includes more realism and has darker shades of colors instead of vibrant ones. There are far too many badass comic book characters to choose from. If you want a safe bet, there’s always Wolverine, arguably the most badass character ever.
The length of an arm provides an incredible canvas for a tattooist. They have a lot of space to work with, and it gives them the opportunity to explore complex imagery that reads like a story on the skin. Or if they prefer abstraction, sleeves are the chance to create a collision of patterns. The conceptual possibilities are endless. Some artists completely cover the skin, like Little Andy who transformed the lower half of his client’s arm into a swirling galaxy. But for those that favor the minimalist approach, La Malafede showcases the impact of a single line as it traces the inside of the whole arm.
The word tattoo, or tattow in the 18th century, is a loanword from the Samoan word tatau, meaning "to strike".[1][2] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the etymology of tattoo as "In 18th c. tattaow, tattow. From Polynesian (Samoan, Tahitian, Tongan, etc.) tatau. In Marquesan, tatu." Before the importation of the Polynesian word, the practice of tattooing had been described in the West as painting, scarring or staining.[3]
×