Inktober Day 4 magentahorse 2 0 Snake tattoo jccerberus 1 0 Framed kaleidoscope-tattoos 0 0 October 7- Back Stab KitKatKittyKatKitten 0 0 My kids in wolf form B-RYZ 0 0 Anchor idea Blue-Simplicity 1 0 Chinese Dragon reepal 0 0 Inktober: Dragon yanadhyana 7 2 Okami - WIP kaleidoscope-tattoos 0 0 Warrior Woman kaleidoscope-tattoos 0 0 Rabbit Food kaleidoscope-tattoos 0 0 Moonmaid kaleidoscope-tattoos 0 0 All In Her Eyes kaleidoscope-tattoos 0 0 Pork Bun Buns kaleidoscope-tattoos 0 0 October 6- Broken Bones KitKatKittyKatKitten 1 0 Home Sweet Home kaleidoscope-tattoos 1 0
"In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, tattoos were as much about self-expression as they were about having a unique way to identify a sailor's body should he be lost at sea or impressed by the British navy. The best source for early American tattoos is the protection papers issued following a 1796 congressional act to safeguard American seamen from impressment. These proto-passports catalogued tattoos alongside birthmarks, scars, race, and height. Using simple techniques and tools, tattoo artists in the early republic typically worked on board ships using anything available as pigments, even gunpowder and urine. Men marked their arms and hands with initials of themselves and loved ones, significant dates, symbols of the seafaring life, liberty poles, crucifixes, and other symbols."[64]
Many studies have been done of the tattooed population and society's view of tattoos. In June 2006, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology published the results of a telephone survey of 2004. It found that 36% of Americans ages 18–29, 24% of those 30–40, and 15% of those 41–51 had a tattoo.[58] In September 2006, the Pew Research Center conducted a telephone survey that found that 36% of Americans ages 18–25, 40% of those 26–40 and 10% of those 41–64 had a tattoo. They concluded that Generation X and Generation Y express themselves through their appearance, and tattoos are the most popular form of self-expression.[59] In January 2008, a survey conducted online by Harris Interactive estimated that 14% of all adults in the United States have a tattoo, slightly down from 2003, when 16% had a tattoo. Among age groups, 9% of those ages 18–24, 32% of those 25–29, 25% of those 30–39 and 12% of those 40–49 have tattoos, as do 8% of those 50–64. Men are slightly more likely to have a tattoo than women.
The Japanese word irezumi means "insertion of ink" and can mean tattoos using tebori, the traditional Japanese hand method, a Western-style machine or any method of tattooing using insertion of ink. The most common word used for traditional Japanese tattoo designs is horimono.[7] Japanese may use the word tattoo to mean non-Japanese styles of tattooing.
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