Having become more prominent than ever, there isn’t a part of the body that is off limits. The ink art has been done on most major and minor skin parts of the body. However, most men prefer having a sleeve tattoo as a man which can be quite impressive when a befitting design and a good color is used in its creation. Generally it appropriate and even advisable to opt for a sleeve tattoo for men as a man compared to having it done on other body parts. Outlined below are reasons why.
Ancient tattooing traditions have also been documented among Papuans and Melanesians, with their use of distinctive obsidian skin piercers. Some archeological sites with these implements are associated with the Austronesian migration into Papua New Guinea and Melanesia. But other sites are older than the Austronesian expansion, being dated to around 1650 to 2000 BCE, suggesting that there was a preexisting tattooing tradition in the region.[37][40]

Every new year dictates new trends when it comes to fashion, make-up, care, footwear, hairstyles and often, tattoos. But there are some things that are always fashionable. Tattoos are individual choices, and nobody can dictate to anyone what to paint on their bodies. People work tattoos according to their own feelings, their own emotions and desires. Everyone likes different things. The most important thing is to feel good in your skin. People do tattoos because of different reasons. Some are tattooed because they like these images of different designs on their skin, some hide some physical defect, and some want to immortalize an event, name, date, or something else that means them.
Dowdell says that Celtic and tribal tattoos are on the way out (and those similar in design). You might associate them with muscled celebrities and athletes, and recognize them for their ornate patterns or scenery. A Celtic tattoo uses black ink to background crosses, trees, or folkloric animals. A tribal tattoo uses black ink to fill in spiraling, zigzagging arrows and lines, often migrating from the pec onto the shoulder and arm. The tricky thing about tattoos is that you still see the ones that are “out of style”, because they’re permanently on the wearer. So, Dowdell’s point is that he’s doing far fewer of these types anymore, in favor of the aforementioned ones. As seen on: The Rock’s shoulder and arm. (His is technically a Polynesian tattoo, but stylistically in the same vein.)
Shop around for artists. The biggest mistake people make is designing their own tattoo before picking out an artist. That design is going to change because no two artists will draw the same object in the same way. Every artist has their own style and flair. Pick one you love based on their style, and work with them to visualize your ideas. If you want a shark tattoo, and the artist doesn't have a shark in his/her portfolio, it doesn't matter. Every artist can draw a shark. It's how they draw it that matters. Once you pick out an artist you like, do some research on what makes a good tattoo artist and see if they check off everything on the list. Aside from style, professionalism and personality are equally important factors.
That’s only one part of the journey though, as you still need to know what to expect and how best to prepare. Fortunately, you can check these sites for everything you need to know before your first tattoo Before You Get a Tattoo, Check These 5 Sites and Apps Before You Get a Tattoo, Check These 5 Sites and Apps Thinking about getting a tattoo? Get answers to most of your concerns with these five tattoo design sites and app. Read More .
Each militarybranch has their own restrictions pertaining to tattoos. As of April 2007, the United States Marines Corp. banned tattoo sleeves except for those already grandfathered in prior to the policy change. If you plan on enlisting you can forget tattoo sleeves for now. This consideration must also be made for employment. Potential employers may have regulations banning sleeve tattoos or any visible tattoos for that matter. If you must stay sheathed from shoulder to wrist, you'll be hot in the summer.
Solid Oak also wants Swain to ignore evidence submitted by Take-Two's experts. It argues a survey about why consumers buy the NBA 2K games is irrelevant; a report that claims there isn't a market for licensing tattoos in video games was written by an anthropologist, not an economist or market researcher; another report that argues the tattoos are rarely noticed in the game is merely speculation; and another expert's report about profits merely states a legal conclusion.
Do not wrap your tattoo again unless the artist says so. It’s highly important to keep the tattoo clean after the protection has been removed. Keep in mind that your new tattoo is similar to an open injury. Plenty of tattoo artists recommend hand-washing the tattoo lightly but thoroughly with your clean fingers, using an unscented and anti-bacterial soap. Let it air dry or pat it gently with a dry and clean paper towel. Everything you use or touch should be clean. It’s also common for a new tattoo to be inflamed, red, or sensitive.
The usual design is comparable to a full-sleeved garment sold by many clothing companies. Why is it so? Well, it is simply because it covers the entire arm parts of the person most of the time. The tattoo design can possibly be a single design that extends from the shoulder up to the wrist part, or a group of smaller gorgeous designs that connect to one another until they reach the wrist part. This has caused the existence of half sleeve design, which only covers half of the person’s arms. These tattoos usually start from the shoulder up to the elbow. However, there are cases that the tattoo starts from the elbow up to the wrist part.
Although Maori women were also tattooed on their faces, the markings tended to be concentrated around the nose and lips. Although Christian missionaries tried to stop the procedure, the women maintained that tattoos around their mouths and chins prevented the skin becoming wrinkled and kept them young; the practice was apparently continued as recently as the 1970s.
But other than that possible health benefit, tattoos are just downright awesome, especially ones that cover a lot of skin like a sleeve does. It provides the most personal and artistic expression, just due to its massive size. Plus, a tattoo sleeve takes multiple tattoo sessions, so there is plenty of time to get used to and fall in love with a new design.   

Shop around for artists. The biggest mistake people make is designing their own tattoo before picking out an artist. That design is going to change because no two artists will draw the same object in the same way. Every artist has their own style and flair. Pick one you love based on their style, and work with them to visualize your ideas. If you want a shark tattoo, and the artist doesn't have a shark in his/her portfolio, it doesn't matter. Every artist can draw a shark. It's how they draw it that matters. Once you pick out an artist you like, do some research on what makes a good tattoo artist and see if they check off everything on the list. Aside from style, professionalism and personality are equally important factors.
The Scythian Pazyryk of the Altai Mountain region were another ancient culture which employed tattoos. In 1948, the 2,400 year old body of a Scythian male was discovered preserved in ice in Siberia, his limbs and torso covered in ornate tattoos of mythical animals. Then, in 1993, a woman with tattoos, again of mythical creatures on her shoulders, wrists and thumb and of similar date, was found in a tomb in Altai. The practice is also confirmed by the Greek writer Herodotus c. 450 B.C., who stated that amongst the Scythians and Thracians "tattoos were a mark of nobility, and not to have them was testimony of low birth.”

In the period of early contact between the Māori and Europeans, the Maori people hunted and decapitated each other for their moko tattoos, which they traded for European items including axes and firearms.[21] Moko tattoos were facial designs worn to indicate lineage, social position, and status within the tribe. The tattoo art was a sacred marker of identity among the Maori and also referred to as a vehicle for storing one's tapu, or spiritual being, in the afterlife.[22]
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