It is funny to see how man people want copies of someone else’s tattoo, where is the originality in that? I think it is a good idea to look at designs to get a better idea of what you like and want, but a bit lame if you are only going to copy someone’s work. A tattoo should be a depiction of your own likes and ideas… Well that is only my 2c worth. Some great sleeves on here… Sitting at the shop at the moment while the artist is prepping for my shoulder piece. Have a great day tattoo lovers

Well, I didn't want to deal with the pain of getting a real sleeve done so I bought these. Interchangeable. There was a couple that I did lose right away, not because of the product but because said "nice tat's where'd you get it done" and I just took it off and gave it to them. Only slight problem is.....if your pale as a ghost or don't wear a watch or shirt, they'll be easy to tell that they're fake. Why do I say this? Let's break it down...I'm 6'1, medium build with decent sized arms. I wear a XL sized shirt. These went from my wrists almost up to the end of my arms. Down by the wrist part is where it ends so you have to fold it under "if your looking for the real look". That poses a small problem with overlap, so to take care of that, put on a watch and wah-lah...problem fixed. They are nylon, obviously and have somewhat of a dark color to them, but not dark..it's more tan. In your hands are white as an albino, obviously...up close, they know they're fake. All in all, great product; no complaints.

Regardless, if you are going to start with a single tattoo, in any location, be sure to tell your artist that your eventual end goal is a full sleeve. “She or he can leave the piece in a way that it can be added to in time,” Gualteros says. “Basically, to get the best result for this, you should ask for flow.” (That’s tattoo-artist speak for “something that will flow nicely with other designs”.)


Discuss and plan with your artist. Never go into this with a permanent vision. You should talk to your tattoo artist about your likes and dislikes and tell them exactly what you want to convey. They will sit down with you and plan out several designs that will incorporate your ideas. Allow them some freedom of artistry. In the end, you will have the final say in what gets permanently inked on your body, but, before then, let the artist do what they do best: design.
Getting a sleeve tattoo is a huge commitment that requires more planning and time than a typical piece of body art. You cannot impulsively choose an image from a binder or the Internet and stick it on your arm. If you want a decent-looking design that doesn't suck and makes you rethink your life choices, then you need to do ample research about the process, think about a theme and style, shop around for reputable artists, and then sit down with the artist of your choice to design the tattoo.
The first documented professional tattooist in Britain was Sutherland Macdonald, who operated out of a salon in London beginning in 1894.[50] In Britain, tattooing was still largely associated with sailors[51] and the lower or even criminal class,[52] but by the 1870s had become fashionable among some members of the upper classes, including royalty,[3][53] and in its upmarket form it could be an expensive[54] and sometimes painful[55] process. A marked class division on the acceptability of the practice continued for some time in Britain.[56] Recently, a trend has arisen marketed as 'Stick and Poke' tattooing; primitive figures are permanently inscribed by the user himself after he obtains a 'DIY' kit containing needles, ink and a collection of suggestions.[57]

This app provide The Different Styles Of Tattoos. Most Popular Tattoo Designs & Ideas for Men and Women from around The World!. As tattoos are available in every size so you can get any part of the body. Like chest, neck, back, shoulder, arm, knuckle, forearm, ribs, lower back, thigh, leg, feet, finger, hand, lips, ankle, under the ear, wrist and many more. And available in various styles like Tribal, Realistic 3d, Watercolor, Drawings, Simple, Portrait, Modern, Geometric, Polynesian, Japanese, Thai, Traditional, Old School, and more. These tattoos designs are liked by tattoo lovers all over the world.
Tattoos have also been used for identification in other ways. As early as the Zhou, Chinese authorities would employ facial tattoos as a punishment for certain crimes or to mark prisoners or slaves. During the Roman Empire, gladiators and slaves were tattooed: exported slaves were tattooed with the words "tax paid", and it was a common practice to tattoo "Stop me, I'm a runaway" on their foreheads.[18] Owing to the Biblical strictures against the practice,[19] Emperor Constantine I banned tattooing the face around AD 330, and the Second Council of Nicaea banned all body markings as a pagan practice in AD 787.[20]
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