Cambodia has a rich history and very ancient temples, it also has beautiful looking characters and words. As such it has become quite popular for people to get tattooed when they travel to Cambodia. It became even more in the last decade since Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie went under the gun with a Khmer style tattoo on her back and since then many have copied this style.
With extensive facial and body tattooing used among Native Americans, such as the Cree, the mummified bodies of a group of six Greenland Inuit women c. A.D. 1475 also revealed evidence for facial tattooing. Infrared examination revealed that five of the women had been tattooed in a line extending over the eyebrows, along the cheeks and in some cases with a series of lines on the chin. Another tattooed female mummy, dated 1,000 years earlier, was also found on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea, her tattoos of dots, lines and hearts confined to the arms and hands.
If you want this as a gag gift, buy it. For $7 it's not bad. If you want these for tattoo design ideas and what a tattoo would look like on your arm, BUY this. The artwork is great & the seams aren't bad. You only see the seam where the design stops and doesn't blend artistically; there's no overlapped stitching running up the seam. It will definitely make a good novelty gift for friends also.
The ultimate peak of rugged style has captured in the tribal sleeve tattoo. The comprehensive designs are connected to our ancestors’ rites involving scarification rituals, and they were already around way before tattoos were even accepted by society. Plenty of historians are certain that tribal tattoos were the first form of ink-based body art ever created. A lot of aboriginal and tribal groups have glorified the use of tribal tattoos, to symbolize a boy’s maturity. These designs have often been associated to the state of reaching full adulthood. This type of symbolism is still being used up to this day.

Tattoodo is a social network designed exclusively for tattoo lovers. Co-founded by Ami James of Miami Ink fame, Tattoodo is one of the most visited tattoo sites in the world. The site, along with accompanying mobile apps, boasts an impressive 30 million users. Having found international acclaim through his TV work, James set out to develop the complete tattoo resource where users can upload and browse ink pics, find and follow artists, view tattoo-related videos, and read interviews and guides.


My neighbour says, “There’s a lot of it about. So many teenagers are doing it.” I stare at pictures of David Beckham with his flowery sleeves, Angelina Jolie all veins and scrawls. Tattoos are everywhere. They seem no more alternative than piercings these days. But I still don’t understand. Sam Cam with her smudgy dolphin, the heavily tattooed at Royal Ascot – these people are role models?
Well, I didn't want to deal with the pain of getting a real sleeve done so I bought these. Interchangeable. There was a couple that I did lose right away, not because of the product but because said "nice tat's where'd you get it done" and I just took it off and gave it to them. Only slight problem is.....if your pale as a ghost or don't wear a watch or shirt, they'll be easy to tell that they're fake. Why do I say this? Let's break it down...I'm 6'1, medium build with decent sized arms. I wear a XL sized shirt. These went from my wrists almost up to the end of my arms. Down by the wrist part is where it ends so you have to fold it under "if your looking for the real look". That poses a small problem with overlap, so to take care of that, put on a watch and wah-lah...problem fixed. They are nylon, obviously and have somewhat of a dark color to them, but not dark..it's more tan. In your hands are white as an albino, obviously...up close, they know they're fake. All in all, great product; no complaints.
The word tattoo, or tattow in the 18th century, is a loanword from the Samoan word tatau, meaning "to strike".[1][2] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the etymology of tattoo as "In 18th c. tattaow, tattow. From Polynesian (Samoan, Tahitian, Tongan, etc.) tatau. In Marquesan, tatu." Before the importation of the Polynesian word, the practice of tattooing had been described in the West as painting, scarring or staining.[3]
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