Deciding to get a tattoo is a big deal, regardless of whether it's your first time under the needle or not. But for a tattoo virgin, the stakes are arguably even higher when it comes to picking a design and spot that won't be hated later. Classic wrist tattoo ideas are always a great place to start for inspiration, IMO, although what you choose to ink is entirely your decision.


A blacked out sleeve tattoo is done by an artist to either cover up an unwanted previous design, or throw in a bold statement to this prominent area of a person’s body. The entire arm is tattooed in black, or white can be added to make a delicate design as a part of the tattoo’s look. If it’s not covered up, a negative space can be left to create a rather unique design. Blackout sleeves won’t happen overnight. Plenty of sittings are involved in this painstakingly slow process, as well as the obvious pain that comes before and during healing. Getting a blacked out sleeve tattoo isn’t a quick fix, but rather, a tattoo decision that requires 100% of the artist and the client’s commitment.

There is no specific rule in the New Testament prohibiting tattoos, and most Christian denominations believe the laws in Leviticus are outdated as well as believing the commandment only applied to the Israelites, not to the gentiles. While most Christian groups tolerate tattoos, some Evangelical and fundamentalist Protestant denominations believe the commandment does apply today for Christians and believe it is a sin to get one.


The basic meaning of serendipity is good luck that you were not looking for. This is often found in the form of a love of your life that you were not necessarily looking for. We really love the font on this one which looks like it was custom made by the tattooist. There are tattooists that specialise in script and it’s always a great idea to see their work before you begin.

Creepy Stories And Urban Legends From Florida These Beauty Products Are Totally Worth the Splurge Get Spooky Crunk In These Haunted Florida Bars The Best Steakhouses in Los Angeles The Best Cold & Flu Relief For Kids 49 Famous Couples with Huge Age Differences Celebrities With Heterochromia Iridis 13 Animals That Are Wreaking Havoc In Florida Right Now Gibsonton, Florida, Is Full Of Circus Freaks (Literally) The Best Breakfast Foods Which 'Rick And Morty' Character Are You, According To Your Zodiac Sign? The Absolute Best of The Anti-Joke Chicken Meme The 40+ Trippiest Anime That Mess With Your Head 15 Totally Weird Sexual Fetishes Hot Girls in Yoga Pants People Who Face Swapped with Face Tattoos 25 Utterly Baffling WikiHow Illustrations The Best Canadian Whiskey Brands
The word tattoo, or tattow in the 18th century, is a loanword from the Samoan word tatau, meaning "to strike".[1][2] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the etymology of tattoo as "In 18th c. tattaow, tattow. From Polynesian (Samoan, Tahitian, Tongan, etc.) tatau. In Marquesan, tatu." Before the importation of the Polynesian word, the practice of tattooing had been described in the West as painting, scarring or staining.[3]
×