Richmond, Virginia has been cited as one of the most tattooed cities in the United States.[60] That distinction led the Valentine Richmond History Center to create an online exhibit titled "History, Ink: The Tattoo Archive Project." The introduction to the exhibit notes, "In the past, western culture associated tattoos with those individuals who lived on the edge of society; however, today they are recognized as a legitimate art form and widely accepted in mainstream culture."
Despite all our advances in technology, the basic needling technique used to insert pigment into skin hasn’t changed all that much over time. The biggest change came when the electric tattooing machine was first patented in 1891. That technology has remained relatively stagnant since–aside from prisoners’ ad hoc redesigns, in which a cassette recorder, an electric razor, or electric toothbrush can be used as a motor. These jailed tattooists’ inventions show just what desperate lengths people will go to to turn a boring patch of bare skin into something that better expresses the self underneath.

So, if you are feeling like you’re ready for a tattoo, but just aren’t quite sure of what, relax! We’ve got your back and plenty of ideas about where you might find personal inspiration. And what’s more, we’re here to help – from tattoo idea conception to flawless delivery by one of the best artists in the nation, all courtesy of your friendly, neighborhood Orlando tattoo shop!


The elaborate tattoos of the Polynesian cultures are thought to have developed over millennia, featuring highly elaborate geometric designs, which in many cases can cover the whole body. Following James Cook's British expedition to Tahiti in 1769, the islanders' term "tatatau" or "tattau," meaning to hit or strike, gave the west our modern term "tattoo." The marks then became fashionable among Europeans, particularly so in the case of men such as sailors and coal-miners, with both professions which carried serious risks and presumably explaining the almost amulet-like use of anchors or miner's lamp tattoos on the men's forearms.
"Aftercare plays a crucial part in a tattoo aging well," Tyson Weed, custom tattoo artist at Divinity Tattoo in Phoenix, AZ, tells Bustle. "First, you have to allow the tattoo to heal properly. If a tattoo is allowed to heal properly there’s no need for a touch up." So if you follow your tattoo artist's instructions word-for-word, you're more likely to have a tattoo that looks amazing through the years.

Redhat.......its ok little man. I realise you hate yourself and must demean others to feel better about yourself. But I have to disagree with you. I think Ashley is a very sexy woman. But regardless you dont have to think she is. However the fact you went out of your way to spread hate makes it clear you also hate yourself. I hope your figure out your own issues. Maybe you'll enjoy life more
Current cultural understandings of tattoos in Europe and North America have been greatly influenced by long-standing stereotypes based on deviant social groups in the 19th and 20th centuries. Particularly in North America, tattoos have been associated with stereotypes, folklore and racism.[22] Not until the 1960s and 1970s did people associate tattoos with such societal outcasts as bikers and prisoners.[76] Today, in the United States many prisoners and criminal gangs use distinctive tattoos to indicate facts about their criminal behavior, prison sentences and organizational affiliation.[77] A teardrop tattoo, for example, can be symbolic of murder, or each tear represents the death of a friend. At the same time, members of the U.S. military have an equally well-established and longstanding history of tattooing to indicate military units, battles, kills, etc., an association that remains widespread among older Americans. In Japan, tattoos are associated with yakuza criminal groups, but there are non-yakuza groups such as Fukushi Masaichi's tattoo association that sought to preserve the skins of dead Japanese who have extensive tattoos. Tattooing is also common in the British Armed Forces. Depending on vocation, tattoos are accepted in a number of professions in America. Companies across many fields are increasingly focused on diversity and inclusion.[78]
We have also examined tattoos on mummified remains of some of the ancient pre-Columbian cultures of Peru and Chile, which often replicate the same highly ornate images of stylized animals and a wide variety of symbols found in their textile and pottery designs. One stunning female figurine of the Naszca culture has what appears to be a huge tattoo right around her lower torso, stretching across her abdomen and extending down to her genitalia and, presumably, once again alluding to the regions associated with birth. Then on the mummified remains which have survived, the tattoos were noted on torsos, limbs, hands, the fingers and thumbs, and sometimes facial tattooing was practiced.
Humans have marked their bodies with tattoos for thousands of years. These permanent designs—sometimes plain, sometimes elaborate, always personal—have served as amulets, status symbols, declarations of love, signs of religious beliefs, adornments and even forms of punishment. Joann Fletcher, research fellow in the department of archaeology at the University of York in Britain, describes the history of tattoos and their cultural significance to people around the world, from the famous " Iceman," a 5,200-year-old frozen mummy, to today’s Maori.
Check out these fine Floridian's tattoos that are a tribute to the Sunshine State, and maybe you'll get some inspiration for your own Florida tattoo! Some of these tattoos you'll see are cute, some are breathtakingly beautiful, and some are tough looking as hell. Seriously, when did tattoos that look like they're being ripped out of your skin become a thing? Vote up the best Florida tattoos below, and be sure to let us know what you think in the comment section. 

Some tribal cultures traditionally created tattoos by cutting designs into the skin and rubbing the resulting wound with ink, ashes or other agents; some cultures continue this practice, which may be an adjunct to scarification. Some cultures create tattooed marks by hand-tapping the ink into the skin using sharpened sticks or animal bones (made into needles) with clay formed disks or, in modern times, actual needles.
The variety is literally endless as they give the liberty to the designer to create something new at every stage of its completion, because of the fact that it is a combination of a large number of small-sized tattoos, rather than being one large and continuous one. The variation can be based not only on the elements of design, but also colors used in creating sleeve style tattoos. Some designers may make these designs in conventional colors such as black and grey, while others can go for more vibrant colors to make sure that the tattoo attracts every person who sees it and definitely demands a second look.

Compasses were traditionally tattooed on sailors and boating enthusiasts. They symbolise not only been at sea but also finding direction in your life or a particular journey you embarked on. Nowadays they are popular for aesthetic value as well as for people such as backpackers who have done a lot of traveling and want a compass design. Some will even have the compass face the direction of their home from where they have moved to so as to have a reminder of where they came from.


Well, I didn't want to deal with the pain of getting a real sleeve done so I bought these. Interchangeable. There was a couple that I did lose right away, not because of the product but because said "nice tat's where'd you get it done" and I just took it off and gave it to them. Only slight problem is.....if your pale as a ghost or don't wear a watch or shirt, they'll be easy to tell that they're fake. Why do I say this? Let's break it down...I'm 6'1, medium build with decent sized arms. I wear a XL sized shirt. These went from my wrists almost up to the end of my arms. Down by the wrist part is where it ends so you have to fold it under "if your looking for the real look". That poses a small problem with overlap, so to take care of that, put on a watch and wah-lah...problem fixed. They are nylon, obviously and have somewhat of a dark color to them, but not dark..it's more tan. In your hands are white as an albino, obviously...up close, they know they're fake. All in all, great product; no complaints.
The word tattoo, or tattow in the 18th century, is a loanword from the Samoan word tatau, meaning "to strike".[1][2] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the etymology of tattoo as "In 18th c. tattaow, tattow. From Polynesian (Samoan, Tahitian, Tongan, etc.) tatau. In Marquesan, tatu." Before the importation of the Polynesian word, the practice of tattooing had been described in the West as painting, scarring or staining.[3]
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